To date, there are at least 115 magazines published around the world that specially caters to women. The women’s magazine publishing has been a lucrative industry. These magazines do not only focus on fashion, shoes and shopping but also to any interest that concerns women. May it be about parenting, health, sports or any imaginable activity that women would be interested into like pottery, tattoo or woodworking. The following are some of the famous and the not-so-ordinary titles in the women’s magazine publishing.

The Lady’s Magazine

Also known as, hold your breaths, Entertaining Companion for the Fair Sex, Appropriated Solely to the Use and Amusement, the Lady’s Magazine is the first women’s magazine. It is a monthly magazine that was produced from 1770 to 1837.

Love, Pearls and Swine Magazine

The unique name of this online magazine is derived from Matthew 7:6 of the Holy Bible. The verse says, “Don’t give what is holy to unholy people. Don’t give pearls to swine! They will trample the pearls, then turn and attack you.” The magazine aims to guide young women who want to get to most out of living in a modern society while still upholding their Christian values. It takes on different topics, from growing pains and faith to fashion and beauty. Abi Olukeye is the magazine’s current Editor-in-Chief.

Marie-Claire

Who is Marie-Claire? Jean Provoust, the magazine’s creator, must be thinking of the ideal French woman when he named this magazine when it was first published in 1937. When WWII began, the publication of the magazine was ceased until 1954. Jean Provoust’s daughter Evelyn later took over when he retired in 1976. The magazine’s theme is “More than Just a Pretty Face.” It makes sure that the magazines talks about topics that are relevant to the modern woman. They include politics and social issues alongside fashion, beauty and lifestyle in their issues. It is distributed to twenty-two countries other than the United States.

Sports Illustrated for Women

Sports Illustrated for Women is published by the one of the industry’s largest magazine publishing firm, the Time Inc. From ten issues per year, Sports Illustrated Women or SI Women has published later on two magazines in a month. The magazine has been attracting women’s attention since women are more interested as participants when it comes to sports. Sadly, the magazine only lasted for two years with twenty issues on it.

Zan-e Rouze

Zan-e-Rouze is the Iranian translation of “Today’s Woman.” It is published in Iran by the publishing house Kayhan during Mohammad Reza Pahlavi’s rule. Kayhan is also known to publish other magazines for sports and children. After the Shah of Iran was overthrown in 1979, the company continued its operation in London. Zan-e-Rouze has then shifted its focus, from gossips to women empowerment.

Seventeen

Every American teenager must have heard this magazine. Seventeen has been first published in 1944 and still continues to enjoy popularity among girls in their tweens and early twenty’s. The magazine features beauty, fashion, health articles and celebrity news. They also have a regular section called Dear Seventeen which gives advices to young women. It has six other international editions in South Africa, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, India and in Hispanic countries.

The Delineator

This magazine's name may sound like “The Terminator” but it is definitely a women’s magazine. It is subtitled as “A Journal of Fashion, Culture, and Fine Arts.” It was published from 1873 to 1937 by the magazine publishing house Butterick. Although it has already ceased publication, the magazine is still a sensation among Art Deco lovers.

It features Victorian styled fashion on its cover with careful details on the clothes, perhaps to serve as a guide for the tailors.

 

The process of magazine publishing involves a diverse variety of the production and dissemination of literature and information.

Magazine publication in all of its many forms, is geared primarily on making information available to the public, regardless of how it is being presented, whether in print or electronic media.

Magazine publishing traces it roots back to the ancient days when paper was first invented and was discovered to be a good form of communication media.

From the simple ink and paper process to the trendiest and most colorful pages of today, magazine publishing has indeed taken a new turn for the better.

Commonly, the publishing process includes the stages of the development, acquisition, copyediting, graphic design, production – printing and its electronic equivalents, marketing and distribution.

However, magazine publishing is not just limited to concept and printing, but it also involves a tedious process before it even reaches the newsstands.

Editorial, commercial, informational and entertainment content are among the most commonly used content for many and most magazine publications, that involves a multi-faceted skill set that not lonely involves warm bodies, but costs money as well.

For the publication business, cost is relative- the better the talent, the pricier it gets. This is also reflective in the commercial aspect of distribution and marketing- the better the quality, the more it costs money to pay for the product.

Another factor for consideration is that book and magazine publishers spend a great deal of time and money buying and commissioning copy, which for many publishers would add more weight, quality and repute to their products.

For a small publishing company or press, it is possible to rely mainly on commissioned material, but as activity and business increases, the need for more works like subscribing to syndicated materials or outsourced printing manuscripts may overwhelm the publisher's commissioned circle of writers.

First is the need for solicited material, which forms part of the actual concept and framework of a magazine publication.

Next and among the most common practice in acquiring material is that writers often submit a proposal, for which the majority of unsolicited submissions come from previously unpublished authors.

These unsolicited manuscripts through what is called a slush pile , where editors which sift through the material to identify manuscripts of sufficient quality or revenue potential. Established and reputable writers are oftentimes represented by a literary agent, who markets their work to publishers and negotiate contracts for their writing materials.

Upon acceptance and endorsement for publication, commissioning editors negotiate the purchase of intellectual property rights and agree on royalty rates for book publications, and copyright license or permission for magazine publications, depending on the material for publication.

This is followed by the editorial process, that takes place once the immediate commercial decisions are taken and the technical legal issues resolved, book authors may be asked to improve the quality of the work through rewriting or smaller changes, after which the editorial staff will edit the work, the process which could also apply to syndicated materials either with a single article or a series.

Magazine publishers usually adopt a house style, oftentimes a format which makes it unique for a specific publishing company, be it a writing style or a lay-out design and the editorial staff will copy edit to ensure that the work matches the style and grammatical requirements of each market.

Material editing may also involve structural changes and requests for more information.

The last in the process of magazine publishing is marketing and distribution, that releases the product to the main market, thus, giving us our adored and subscribed magazine publishing.